Publicat în Livia Harper

Boyfriend Glasses (Greta Bell #1) by Livia Harper

Synopsis:

The first time Greta saw Blake, she knew he was the one. Knew it like fire knows tinder.

She hadn’t thought she’d be at a frat party her first week in college, but her roommate, Amber, convinced her to go. Greta couldn’t believe how easy it was to get in. It seemed like they threw those parties just so girls like her would come. But she was pretty now, and everything was different. No one knew anything about her ugly duckling past or all the darkness before. It was a whole new world, a brand new start. Then she saw Blake and knew he was her destiny.

But Blake saw Amber first. And he got…confused. Blake was her soul mate. She could tell. She knew all about soul mates.

Too bad about her last one.

Review:

Sick, sick, sick, it’s mental and I fricking loved it. This was by far the craziest novel that I’ve read in… I don’t know… forever?

I definitely did not expect something like this! From the book’s description you can already imagine that something is twisted and wrong, but in no way you can fathom the level of insanity that you will encounter between the pages.

At some point, I was honestly wondering if there are people who are so insane in reality. Then I decided that I don’t actually want to find out. I prefer living in my small glass bubble where everything is fine and everyone is normal and continue imagining that only in books things can go so, so wrong. But afterwards, I noticed some other Goodreads reviews that are mentioning the “Clerambault syndrome” and of course I had to google that and omg, it’s real and damn scary and we should all be afraid to live in this world.

I don’t want to spoil anything from the book, I don’t want to dissect the character’s motives and actions. But I can promise you that you’ll be hooked from the first to the last page and that if you take any breaks from reading, your mind will not be able to concentrate on anything else. You’ll just wish to get back to the story as soon as you can and find out what in the world will happen next. It’s absolutely addictive. I bought the next two books from the series as soon as I reached the last page of Boyfriend Glasses and I swear I felt like my fingers were not moving fast enough on the screen to complete the purchase, that’s how much the adrenaline was pumping through my veins.

If you’re still not convinced to give this book a chance, please be informed that for the moment, it’s still free on Amazon. And even if your reading list is never ending long, be sure that you will finish it in a day or two, so you have no excuse not to let yourself dive into all the madness that this book offers. So do yourself a favor and get it as soon as you can. Be ready for a ride that will defy your logical chain of thoughts and turn the table upside down. You’ll thank me later.

Publicat în Kim Liggett

The Grace Year by Kim Liggett

Synopsis:

A speculative thriller in the vein of The Handmaid’s Tale and The Power. Optioned by Universal and Elizabeth Banks to be a major motion picture!

SURVIVE THE YEAR.

No one speaks of the grace year. It’s forbidden.

In Garner County, girls are told they have the power to lure grown men from their beds, to drive women mad with jealousy. They believe their very skin emits a powerful aphrodisiac, the potent essence of youth, of a girl on the edge of womanhood. That’s why they’re banished for their sixteenth year, to release their magic into the wild so they can return purified and ready for marriage. But not all of them will make it home alive.

Sixteen-year-old Tierney James dreams of a better life—a society that doesn’t pit friend against friend or woman against woman, but as her own grace year draws near, she quickly realizes that it’s not just the brutal elements they must fear. It’s not even the poachers in the woods, men who are waiting for a chance to grab one of the girls in order to make a fortune on the black market. Their greatest threat may very well be each other.

With sharp prose and gritty realism, The Grace Year examines the complex and sometimes twisted relationships between girls, the women they eventually become, and the difficult decisions they make in-between.

Review:

I started this book. Found it too slow after some pages and abandoned it for a few weeks. Afterwards, I started seeing it mentioned all over the Internet as one of the best new stories you could put your hands on. Got back to it and… couldn’t stop until the ending. At 6AM… Daaaamn, what I was about to miss if I didn’t give it a second chance!

I honestly thought that I’ve read so many Young Adult dystopian novels for the last few years that there’s no chance of any new book of this type to still surprise me or get me hooked up. That’s pretty much what I had in mind when I started The Grace Year and the slow paced beginning didn’t really encourage me to change my opinion. I’m so grateful that I trusted those articles saying that you shouldn’t miss this book!

Slowly, the classical story of the rebellious girl who opposes the traditional and over controlling society starts to grow new and surprising threads and lets you uncover hidden meanings. Perhaps the storyline doesn’t differ so much from other books of this kind. But there’s so much more depth between the pages, so much freedom to choose whatever you wish to understand from it, so much pain and hope and happiness and destruction, all of them entwined together, all of them starting to gradually flow through your blood stream. Moreover, the most important and impressive fights are not the ones with other people or with the horrific system, but the internal ones, with your own beliefs, with everything that you grew up to have faith in and that is slowly shattering behind your eyes.

Your eyes are wide open, but you see nothing.” This is what the story is about. About getting out of your comfort zone, opening your mind and seeing the verity against all odds, letting go of all the pride and certainty that what you know is what the truth really is. Because that’s the hardest fight you could ever win and some of us never do.

The book is violent and bitter, with small moments of hope that sparkle like lost fireflies in the darkest night. Even the ending, although you might call it a somewhat happy ending, is not bringing any miraculous changes. But it does leave traces of hope: of a better life, of a better society, of hidden kindness that lies within the people you wouldn’t expect and in the most unforeseen places. And sometimes, this is the best we can do and the most realistic aspiration that humanity could have.

Publicat în Charlotte Duckworth

Unfollow Me by Charlotte Duckworth

Synopsis:

A gripping domestic thriller examining the terrifying depths of our social media obsessions.

You can’t stop watching her.

Violet Young is a hugely popular journalist-turned-mummy-influencer, with three children, a successful husband and a million subscribers on YouTube who tune in daily to watch her everyday life unfold.

Until the day she’s no longer there.

But one day she disappears from the online world – her entire social media presence deleted overnight, with no explanation. Has she simply decided that baring her life to all online is no longer a good idea, or has something more sinister happened to Violet?

But do you really know who Violet is?

Her fans are obsessed with finding out the truth, but their search quickly reveals a web of lies, betrayal, and shocking consequences…

Review:

No matter how hard you’d try to stay away from all the social media, it became such a big part of our lives that it’s absolutely impossible not to be struck on a daily basis by news, videos, articles and photos of the never ending number of “influencers”. Today, everyone’s a blogger or a vlogger or some kind of an online celebrity and their fame rivals more and more the success of traditional famous people: singers, actors, athletes etc. Maybe one of the reasons is that they seem more “like us”, easier to relate to, giving you the false feeling of closure, of affiliation, of being your friend.

Fame grows with the numbers of followers. But probably what Violet Young, a famous Instagram mommy vlogger, didn’t consider when showering into all those benefits of her successful online career is that part of her fame grew on the obsession of her followers. Her daily videos become the center of their lives, the most awaited part of their days, the reason they keep going during difficult moments. And when all her accounts are suddenly erased and she completely disappears from the Internet, her fans go crazy. And they won’t stop at anything to find her.

Unfollow Me comes with an amazing idea, wonderfully executed. The whole story is incredibly realistic and perfectly set up in this era that we’re living in.

Every chapter leaves you eager for more, there’s not a single boring page or paragraph that would prolong the story unnecessarily. The perspective changes from a character to another and for more than half of the book, it’s impossible to anticipate in what ways could their separate stories intertwine. The only thing all these people seem to have in common is their obsession over Violet. Only later, dark twists start to unfold in complicated and shocking paths and slowly, you’re allowed to connect the dots and reveal the whole picture.

I read this book without even breathing, devouring each word, each page, dying to know how the story of each character will evolve.

The rhythm is fast paced, the suspense is palpable but in the same time, there’s no feeling of shallowness throughout the novel. Charlotte Duckworth is digging through the human psychology like an expert, cold and precise, not fearing to expose the darkest corners of our minds, the shadiest wishes, the secrets that some people wouldn’t hesitate to kill for, in order to keep them hidden.

Publicat în Michael Crichton

Airframe by Michael Crichton

Synopsis:

The twin jet plane en route to Denver from Hong Kong is merely a green radar blip half an hour off the California coast when the call comes through to air traffic control:

‘Socal Approach, this is TransPacific 545. We have an emergency.’ The pilot requests priority clearance to land – then comes the bombshell – he needs forty ambulances on the runway.

But nothing prepares the rescue workers for the carnage they witness when they enter the plane.

Ninety-four passengers are injured. Three dead. The interior cabin virtually destroyed.

What happened on board Flight TPA 545?

Review:

I always loved those TV shows with aircraft disasters so when I read the description of this book, it was impossible not to put it in my cart. And I did like it, but honestly, not as much as I thought I would. Probably if it would have been at least a hundred pages shorter, the whole reading experience would have been much more enjoyable. But the way it is, I just found it to have way, way too many technical details for a casual reader. Of course, whenever a writer is choosing a topic that he’s not familiar with, he needs to gather as much information as possible in order to deliver a realistic story. But I feel like Michael Crichton overdid it in Airframe. Probably the people working as pilots or in aircraft engineering would find the book extremely accurate and realistic. But a normal reader will be completely lost in the never ending load of acronyms and technical items and aircraft pieces, no matter how well the author tried to explain them. It’s just too much and with every new details your interest drops a little.

Yes, I finished the book and no, it wasn’t a disappointment. But I honestly felt it more like a burden than a pleasure, since for every good twist you have to pay by enduring pages of useless details.

The last quarter of the novel starts having a faster rhythm, the accent falls more and more on the action instead of descriptions so you will probably find yourself reading it with more curiosity and excitement.

I can’t talk about the characters, because they felt more like chess pawns arranged in a way meant to deliver the storyline. We get a minimum amount of information about them, as the whole attention is centered mainly around the events. I got the sensation that the investigation of what happened on the Flight TPA 545 is both the story and the main character of the book and not the persons involved in it.

Airframe is a pretty good story but be warned that you need to prepare your mind with all the patience you can possibly gather in order to get over the scores and scores of technical terms to really get to enjoy the book.

Publicat în Nina Laurin

The Starter Wife by Nina Laurin

Synopsis:

„Local police have announced that they’re closing the investigation of the suspected drowning of 37-year-old painter Colleen Westcott. She disappeared on April 11, 2010, and her car was found parked near the waterfront in Cleveland two days later, but her body has never been found. The chief of police has stated that no concrete evidence of foul play has been discovered in the probe.”

I close the online search window, annoyed. These articles never have enough detail. They think my husband’s first wife disappeared or they think she is dead. There’s a big difference.

My phone rings, jarring me away from my thoughts, and when I pick it up, it’s an unknown number. The only answer to my slightly breathless hello is empty static.

When the voice does finally come, it’s female, low, muffled somehow. „Where is it, Claire? What did you do with it? Tell me where it is.”

A woman. A real flesh-and-blood woman on the other end of the phone. She’s not just in my head.

A wave of panic spreads under my skin like ice water. It’s Colleen.

Review:

Oh, how confused I felt during the reading of this book…

It starts as a classic family thriller, with a growing feeling of unhappiness, in contrast to the dreams of joy that the main character had when she got married to the one who looked like the ideal husband. And then, slowly, things start to change and you get the feeling that something is wrong, although you cannot really put your finger on what exactly it is. The heroine starts acting weirder than the situation would ask for, normal things begin to look shady, the characters keep changing colors from white to black and vice versa from one chapter to another.

At some point, I was annoyed with the heroine, thinking she’s overreacting and going paranoid for absolutely nothing. Because we’re getting the whole story from her point of view, for a while things don’t seem to make sense, everything is foggy and unclear.

Not until the perspective changes and all of a sudden, boom! Here comes the shocking truth and after that, everything is spiraling out of control, all the puzzle pieces start falling in the right places and you discover a whole new story, in a way you couldn’t have predicted in a million years.