Publicat în Miranda Rijks

You Are Mine by Miranda Rijks

Synopsis:

Rupert has spent years searching for his perfect wife. Now he’s found her.

Her name is Charlotte Aldridge and she’s wonderful. A talented artist, modest and beautiful, she’s everything he ever dreamed of. Her hair, her eyes, her mouth – every little detail is perfect.

Rupert is confident that when they meet, she’ll fall in love with him just as he has with her. After all, he’s a wealthy British aristocrat. And he’s handsome – the relentless gym workouts and extensive plastic surgery have seen to that.

But what if Charlotte can’t see that they’re a perfect fit, that they’re meant for each other? Well, Rupert can be very persuasive. His father taught him certain methods which are extremely effective. Methods that can turn the most determined, ‘I don’t’ into a meek and submissive, ‘I do’….

Review:

Not good, not bad either. Or maybe I just read a lot of similar kind of books lately. Therefore, You Are Mine seemed just “meh”, even if I don’t really find anything specific to criticize.

Charlotte is a painter. Financially broke, with her heart shattered and not much to look forward to the future, she reluctantly accepts an offer from a young millionaire to move to his house for a few weeks and paint his portrait. But Rupert’s plan is not as innocent as it looks.

You Are Mine is yet another story about obsession, trauma, ignored sickness and mistakes that piled up until things explode. What seemed to be like an advantageous vacation will turn into a nightmare for Charlotte.

The story is entertaining, especially since the POV changes between the two main characters so readers will get a full view and see each fact from a completely different angle. Which is truly impressive and scary in the same time, because any small, innocent detail can be the trigger for a potential disaster. It starts slowly, but once the things are put in motion, they’re cascading with an unstoppable force. Just like Charlotte, the reader won’t even have time to prepare itself for the course of unexpected turns that follows.

Although not memorable, both Charlotte and Rupert’s roles are well written and realistic, not in white and black but in a complex palette of colors, with good and bad parts. And the most engrossing part comes in the end, when all the events that you knew from the beginning and that didn’t even seem intriguing will start to be connected in a very sick way.

You Are Mine will definitely keep you up at nights when all you wish for is an absorbing psychological thriller. It might be a great choice for a reader who’s just starting to explore this genre, but it won’t bring a lot to the veterans who are devouring this type of books.